077.R62.LittleDog’ Robot

LittleDog’ Robot. The Last Time we Saw the “LittleDog”, we Called him “Cute”. Now, here he is Nearly a Year Later and as you Can See, DARPA’s Experimental Robot Dog, Has Gotten a Lot More Graceful, Even Over the Rockiest of Terrain. Now, we Can Justifiably Call him Something between Uncanny and Scary. Most of the Time, this Smart Bot’s Lost his Cable Tail and Gone Wireless.

>link
>video

076.R61.Jumping robot

Jumping robot. Jumping and Rolling Robot Can Handle Any Terrain. Rhodri Armour, a PhD student from the University of Bath, has invented a robot that he hopes will be a model for future space exploration and land surveying robots. Called the Jollbot, it’s a spherical robot that rolls over smooth terrain and jumps “like a grasshopper” when it encounters obstacles.
>link
>video

071.R58.Omni whell

Omni wheels or poly wheels, similar to mecanum wheels, are wheels with small discs around the circumference which are perpendicular to the rolling direction. The effect is that the wheel will roll with full force, but will also slide laterally with great ease. These wheels are often employed in holonomic drive systems.
A platform employing three omni wheels in a triangular configuration is generally called Kiwi Drive. The Killough platform is similar; so named after Stephen Killough’s work with omnidirectional platforms at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Killough’s 1994 design used pairs of wheels mounted in cages at right angles to each other and thereby achieved holonomic movement without using true omni wheels.
They are often used in small robots. In leagues such as Robocup, many robots use these wheels to have the ability to move in all directions. Omni wheels are also sometimes employed as powered casters for differential drive robots to make turning faster. However, this design is not commonly used as it leads to Fishtailing.
Omniwheels combined with conventional wheels provide interesting performance properties, such as on a six wheel vehicle employing two conventional wheels on a center axle and four omniwheels on front and rear axles.
>link

067.R54. Robot biomimicry

Scientists at the University of California Berkeley are convinced they are offering a breakthrough in robot design. Their study of living organisms has offered insights which they’ve adapted to the world’s first robotic cockroach, or, Robo Roach. Graham discovers how the ingenuity of nature may help develop technology that could finally bring about the robot revolution.
>link

065.R52. Cockroach

…These researchers have used biomimicry of the cockroach, one of nature’s most successful species, to design and build sprawl-legged robots that can move very quickly (up to five body-lengths per second). In addition, these robots are very good at manoeuvring in changing terrain, and can continue forward motion when encountering hip-height obstacles or uphill and downhill slopes of up to 24 degrees. These types of small, fast robots could potentially be used for military reconnaissance, bomb defusion and de-mining expeditions.
Biomimetic robots are even being considered by NASA’s Institute for Advanced Concepts for use in exploring the planet Mars. While these ideas are only in the brainstorming phase, many researchers believe that only robots designed based on insect models would be able to generate enough lift in Mars’ low-density atmosphere to take off, hover and land to explore the Red Planet. However, one must bear in mind that the fluid dynamics of small insects are very different from that of large robots. Since tiny organisms interact with their fluid environment at different Reynold’s numbers (a value indicating the viscosity of the fluid relative to the size of the organism), the air through which they fly is relatively more viscous than it would be for a larger organism, like swimming through molasses as opposed to water. As a result, one cannot be certain that a large scale model of insect flight would be able to interact with the air in the same way as a real insect to enable flight (this problem would also be worsened by the thin atmosphere on Mars)…
>link

064.R51. Stickybot

 

Este robot escalador es la última versión de StickyBot de Stanford, pesa tres cientos gramos y puede subir un cristal a cuatro centímetros por segundo. Es impresionante como el robot suelta sus dedos del pie similar a como lo hacen las verdaderas salamandras. Uno de los problemas más grandes para los desarrolladores, ha sido tratar de emular los dedos del pie del animal los que naturalmente se adhieren a todo terreno.
>link
>youtube

052.R39. Aerospace Vehicle

Aircraft of the future will not be built of traditional, multiple, mechanically connected parts and systems. Instead, aircraft wing construction will employ fully-integrated, embedded “smart” materials and actuators that will enable aircraft wings with unprecedented levels of aerodynamic efficiencies and aircraft control.
Able to respond to the constantly varying conditions of flight, sensors will act like the “nerves” in a bird’s wing and will measure the pressure over the entire surface of the wing. The response to these measurements will direct actuators, which will function like the bird’s wing “muscles.” Just as a bird instinctively uses different feathers on its wings to control its flight, the actuators will change the shape of the aircraft’s wings to continually optimize flying conditions. Active flow control effectors will help mitigate adverse aircraft motions when turbulent air conditions are encountered.
>link

050.R37. Triciclo magnético

Campo magnético motriz. Este es el concepto de vehículo que nos plantea Matus Prochaczka, diseñador eslovaco, que mira con optimismo el uso del campo magnético en nuestras carreteras.
Dejando a un lado la estética del vehículo, algo cinematográfica, la idea es que sea propulsado mediante un motor eléctrico pero apoyándose en paneles magnéticos que requieren nuestras carreteras. No solo se trata de un concepto de vehículo sino de un concepto de propulsión basado, no tengo muy claro como en una infraestructura aún inexistente en nuestras carreteras. En cualquier caso las formas no dejan indiferente.
>link

048.R35 Magnetic drive

Makota Makita & Hiroshi Tsuzaki. This is known as the “Zero” and is a marvel of modern industrial design. It is a prototype of a bike with hubless, magnetically suspeded wheels and a magnetic drive. The bike is very lightweight and powered by cranking magnetic pedals which rotate the tires suspended between other magnets. I hve included these designers and their product because I feel the fluid shapes and innovation of the design are amazing. The sheer complexity of creating something like this bike is incredible, then packaging it in such an uncluttered form is something I admire. It is ‘simple, clean and stylish’ – as outlined in the assessment.
>link

047.R34 Oxygen Production Technology

NASA Tests Lunar Rovers and Oxygen Production Technology NASA has concluded nearly two weeks of testing equipment and lunar rover concepts on Hawaii’s volcanic soil. The agency’s In Situ Resource Utilization Project, which studies ways astronauts can use resources found at landing sites, demonstrated how people might prospect for resources on the moon and make their own oxygen from lunar rocks and soil.
>link

045.R32. Climbing wall

Un rocódromo es una instalación preparada específicamente para practicar la escalada al objeto de evitar el desplazarse a la montaña. Está equipada con presas y seguros. Su forma y tamaño pueden ser libres o estar condicionados por el edificio donde se aloja.
Presas. Objetos de diferentes tamaños, formas y colores, que simulan los agarres que se pueden encontrar en una pared de montaña.

043.R30. Ballance

Masaaki Kumagai and Takaya Ochiai at the Robot Development Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Intelligent Systems, Tohoku Gakuin University, Japan have developed a robot that can balance on a ball – even while carrying heavy loads. While this might at first just seem like a cool trick, it also shows how a robot could be designed to be omni-directional by traveling using a ball, rather than simple wheels.
>link
>youtube

039.R26. Air ray

 

Air_ray, modelled on the manta ray, is a remote-controlled hybrid construction consisting of a helium-filled ballonet and a beating wing drive. Its lightweight design enables it to “swim” in the sea of air using the lift from the helium in a similar way to the manta ray in water.
Propulsion is achieved by a beating wing drive. The servo drive-controlled wing, which can move up and down, utilises the Fin Ray Effect® and is based on alternate pulling and pushing flanks connected via frames. When pressure is exerted on one edge, the geometrical structure automatically curves against the direction of the influencing force. A servo drive pulls the two flanks alternately in longitudinal direction, thus moving the wing up and down.
>link

038.R25. AirPenguin

AirPenguin – autonomously flying robotic penguins
With the AirPenguins, the engineers from Festo have created artificial penguins and have taught them “autonomous flight in the sea of air”. For this purpose, control and regulating technology had to be further developed into self-regulating biomechatronic systems, which could also play a future role in adaptive production.A group of three autonomously flying penguins hovers freely through a defined air space that is monitored by ultrasound transmission stations. The penguins are at liberty to move within this space; a microcontroller gives them free will in order to explore it.
>link